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Kingwood, Texas Information

Richmond is a city in the seat of Fort Bend County in the U.S. state of Texas within the Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown metropolitan area. As of the 2010 U.S. Census, the city population was 11,679. Richmond city boundaries are joined on one hand with Sugar Land and with the city of Rosenberg on the other hand.

Even though it is the county seat, thus containing most of the local government offices, and the historic center of the area, it actually is one of the smaller cities in the area. Adjacent Sugar Land is the largest city in the county.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.9 square miles (10 km2), of which, 3.7 square miles (9.6 km2) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.52 km2) of it (5.58%) is water.

In 2003 Jeannie Kever of the Houston Chronicle said “Some of the old buildings have been reincarnated as shops or law offices. But in other ways, life in Richmond isn’t so different from that in the big city, with its Wal-Mart and fast-food joints, check-cashing businesses and strip-center sprawl.” As of 2006 several strip malls are along U.S. Route 59. During the same year the community included tack stores, two lane blacktop roads, horse ranches. John P. Lopez of the Houston Chronicle said “Richmond is a city of contradiction and transition. It’s as if the place is not sure if it wants to be a part of Houston’s bustle or remain a slow-paced farm and ranch town. It tries to be both” and “It is part Acres Homes, part Fort Bend County Fair.”

John P. Lopez of the Houston Chronicle said in 2006 that “There are a lot of simple scenes. And there are places where reality has polluted neighborhoods.”

The wealthiest neighborhood, as of 2003, in Richmond is Hillcrest. Winston Terrace, another community, had its first houses built in 1940. Construction increased around the end of World War II. Most of the houses were built between 1940 and 1965. Jeannie Kever of the Houston Chronicle said that Winston Terrace is “a swath of mid-20th-century America, with sweeping oak trees and colorful brick or wood bungalows, named for the descendants of one of the region’s most illustrious pioneers.”

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